Military Infantry Division Patches

Page 9 of 12
Information extracted from the book
"US ARMY PATCHES"
by Barry Jason Stein
Used by permission

Divisions either organized before or during World War I did not use the designation "infantry."  The re-designation of thesorganized to include specialists in a wide variety of functions.  A standard infantry division of the World War II era, for example, was designed for open warfare and, consequently, a pool of motor transport and artillery were assigned to them.  It was this combined-arms formation that gained permanent status.  Specialized combat or logistical support was provided by corps and army-level units.  Beside the infantry division, motorized and airborne divisions were formed as well as a light (truck) division, a light (jungle) division, and a mountain division.  The airborne division was initially a miniature version of the infantry division with the addition of a small antiaircraft battalion, one parachute, and two glider regiments.
Information extracted from the book "US ARMY PATCHES"  by Barry Jason Steine divisions as infantry came sometime after World War I when the divisions' structure was re

USED BY PERMISSION

87th Div patch
87th Div

Worn from:  9 November 1918 - 15 February 1957.

Re-designate:  Eighty-seventh Maneuver Area Command.  Worn from:  2 April 1970 - 1995.

Re-designated:  Eighty-seventh Division (Exercise).  Worn from:  1995 - Current.

The acorn is a symbol of the strength of the division that was originally formed from men in Louisiana, Arkansas, and Mississippi during World War I.

Campaigns:  World War I, World War II (Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe).


/88th ARSC patch
88th ARSC

Worn from:  12 November 1918 - 24 October 1947.

Re-designated:  Eighty-eighth Army Reserve Command.  Worn from:  21 August 1974 - 1994.

Re-designated:  Eighty-eighth Army Regional Support Command.  Worn from:  1994 - Current.

Organized in August 1917 as the Eighty-eighth Division at Camp Dodge, Iowa. The four-leaf clover, formed by the two figure 8's, represents the Dakotas, Minnesota, Iowa, and Illinois.  Personnel for the division were drawn from these states.  Blue is the color for infantry, the unit's former designation.

Campaigns:  World War I (Alsace 1918), World War II (Rome-Arno, North Apennines, Po Valley).

Decorations:  French Croix de Guerre with Palm (streamer embroidered Central Italy).


88th Inf Div patch
88th Inf Div

Worn from:  1946 - 1947.

From 1946 - 1947 the Eighty-eighth "Blue Devil" Division and units of the British Thirteenth Corps were stationed in the northeast of Italy as occupation troops.  The Italians noticed that the British troops wore shoulder titles while the Americans did not.  A small cottage industry developed to provide the Americans with hand embroidered patches that combined titles with matching clover leaves.  This is an example of a combined insignia.  The tab identifies the division's title and number.  Some clover leaves had the devil's head embroidered in the center as shown here.  This design comes from the distinctive insignia of the divisional headquarters.


89th Inf Div patch 1
89th Inf Div

Worn from:  25 October 1918 - 6 December 1948.


89th Inf Div patch 2
89th Inf Div2
 


Worn from:  5 August 1917 - 24 June 1921.

The sunflower denotes that men from the state of Kansas were among the troops allocated to this division.


/89th Inf Div patch 3
89th Inf Div3

Worn from:  5 August 1917 - 24 June 1921.


89th ARSC patch
89th ARSC

Worn from:  6 December 1948 - 1 October 1959.

Re-designated:  Eighty-ninth Division Training.  Worn from:  1 October 1959 - 1 October 1973.

Re-designated:  Eighty-ninth Army Reserve Command.  Worn from:  23 August 1974 - 1995.

Re-designated:  Eighty-ninth Army Regional Support Command.  Worn from:  1995 - Current.

Red, white, and blue are the national colors.  The stylized "W," which when reversed becomes an "M," refers to this organization.  In the past it was known as the Middle West Division because it was formed of men from Kansas, Missouri, and Colorado in World War I.

Campaigns:  World War I (St.-Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Lorraine 1918), World War II (Rhineland, Central Europe).

 

90th ARSC patch
90th ARSC

Worn from:  25 October 1918 - 31 December 1965.

Re-designated:  Ninetieth Army Reserve Command.  Worn from:  23 August 1974 - 1995.

Re-designated:  Ninetieth Army Regional Support Command.  Worn from:  1995 - Current.

The "OT" monogram refers to Oklahoma and Texas, two states from which the original personnel came when the organization was formed in World War I.  "OT" are also the initials of the division's nickname, Tough 'Ombres.

Campaigns:  World War I (St.-Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Lorraine 1918), World War II (Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Argennes-Alsace, Central Europe).

Decorations:  French Croix de Guerre with Palm (streamer embroidered Moselle-Saar Rivers).


91st Inf Div  patch
91st Inf Div


Worn from:  8 December 1918 - 28 February 1967.

The Ninety-first Division, formed of men from Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, Wyoming, and Utah, was organized at Camp Lewis, Washington in August 1917.  The fir tree symbolic of readiness, is also typical of the Far West, the home of the division.

Campaigns:  World War I (Ypres-Lys, Meuse-Argonne, Lorraine 1918), World War II (Rome-Arno, North Apennines, Po Valley).


91st Div Tng patch
91st Div Tng
 

Worn from:  6 March 1968 - 1 July 1993.

The green fir tree, typical of the Far West, was selected for the insignia of the Ninety-first Division, which was formed in World War I by men from Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, Wyoming, and Utah.  The tree is symbolic of readiness and boldness, the color green signifies fidelity and steadfastness of purpose.  The horizontal division of the shield, a symbol of protection, and the yellow border were suggested by the flag bases authorized for divisions, blue referring to infantry, red to artillery, and yellow to armor.

Campaigns:  World War I (Ypres-Lys, Meuse-Argonne, Lorraine 1918), World War II (Rome-Arno, North Apennines, Po Valley).


91st Div exercise patch
91st Div

Worn from:  1 July 1993 - 1995.

Re-designated:  Ninety-first Division (Exercise).  Worn from:  1995 - Current.

The Ninety-first Division was organized at Camp Lewis, Washington in August 1917.  The green fir tree is symbolic of readiness and boldness, the color green signifies fidelity and steadfastness of purpose.  The simplicity of the present design recalls service in World Wars I and II when the Ninety-first Division wore the distinctive fir tree.  This design incorporates the unit's designation superimposed on the tree.

Campaigns:  World War I (Ypres-Lys, Meuse-Argonne, Lorraine 1918), World War II (Rome-Arno, North Apennines, Po Valley).



92nd Inf Div patch
92nd Inf Div

Worn from:  20 October 1918 - 28 November 1945.

The Ninety-second Division, organized in October 1917 at Camp Funston, Kansas, was formed of African American soldiers from all states.  Before leaving for France in 1918, the Ninety-second was divided among several camps with Dodge, Dix, and Meade containing the largest units.  The buffalo was selected as the divisional insignia because it is said the Indians referred to African American soldiers as "buffalo soldier."  The nickname Buffalo Division was inherited from the 367th Infantry, one of the first units of the division organized.

Campaigns:  World War I (Meuse-Argonne, Lorraine 1918), World War II (North Apennines, Po Valley).

Decorations:  Italian Croce al Merito di Guerre (streamer embroidered Italy).

 


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