Military Infantry Division Patches

Page 4 of 12
Information extracted from the book
"US ARMY PATCHES"
by Barry Jason Stein
Used by permission

Page 4 of 12

Divisions either organized before or during World War I did not use the designation "infantry."  The re-designation of these divisions as infantry came sometime after World War I when the divisions' structure was reorganized to include specialists in a wide variety of functions.  A standard infantry division of the World War II era, for example, was designed for open warfare and, consequently, a pool of motor transport and artillery were assigned to them.  It was this combined-arms formation that gained permanent status.  Specialized combat or logistical support was provided by corps and army-level units.  Beside the infantry division, motorized and airborne divisions were formed as well as a light (truck) division, a light (jungle) division, and a mountain division.  The airborne division was initially a miniature version of the infantry division with the addition of a small antiaircraft battalion, one parachute, and two glider regiments.

Information extracted from the book "US ARMY PATCHES"  by Barry Jason Stein

USED BY PERMISSION


 
31st Armor Bde patch

31st Armor Bde

Alabama Army National Guard

Worn from:  7 March 1919 - 21 december 1945.

Re-designated as the Thirty-first Armored Brigade.  Worn from:  9 September 1974 - Current.

The two "D's" stand for the "Dixie Division,"  a nickname given during World War I to the Thirty-first Division which was organized from the National Guard of Georgia, Alabama, and Florida during August 1917 at Camp Wheeler, Georgia.  Personnel were absorbed by an element of the Thirty-first Division and organized in early 1861 at Tuscaloosa, Alabama, as the Warrior Guards (Captain Rhode's Company of Alabama Volunteers) and mustered into Confederate service in May 1861 at Montgomery as Company G, Fifth Alabama Infantry.

Campaigns:  Civil War -- Confederate (First Manassas, Peninsula,  Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Appomattox, Maryland 1862, Virginia 1863 and 1864, North Carolina 1864), World War I, World War II (New Guinea, Southern Philippines).

Decorations:  Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (streamer embroidered 17 October 1944 - July 1945).


32nd Inf Bde patch
32nd Inf Bde

Wisconsin Army National Guard

Worn from:  11 November 1918 - 28 February 1946 and 15 October 1961 - 10 August 1962.

Re-designated as the Thirty-second Infantry Brigade.  Worn from:  30 December 1967 - 18 March 1986.

The Thirty-second Division was organized from the National Guard of Michigan and Wisconsin at Camp McArthur, Texas, during August 1917 and was re-designated in February 1942 as the Thirty-second Infantry Division.  The arrow, with a line horizontally through the center, was chosen because the division "shot through every line the Boche put before them."

Campaigns:  World War I (Aisne-Marne, Oise-Aisne, Meuse-Argonne, Alsace 1918, Champagne 1918), World War II (Papua, New Guinea; Leyte; Luzon; BIsmarck Archipelago; East Indies).

Decorations:  Presidential Unit Citation -- Army (streamer embroidered Papua), Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (streamer embroidered 17 October 1944 - July 1945), Presidential Unit Citation -- Army (streamer embroidered Luzon), French Croix de Guerre with Silver Star -- World War I (streamer embroidered Aisne-Marne, and Oise-Aisne).


33rd Inf Bde patch

33rd Inf Bde

Illinois Army National Guard

Worn from:  21 October 1918 - 5 February 1946.

Re-designated as the Thirty-third Infantry Brigade (Prairie).  Worn from:  1 February 1968 - Current.

The design and colors of the patch are said to have been adopted to prevent the theft of regimental property by the Moros, a native tribe indigenous to the Philippines, where elements of the division were stationed.  The design was considered taboo by the tribe.  

Campaigns:  World War I (Lorraine, AIsne-Marne, Oise-Aisne, Meuse-Argonne), World War II (New Guinea, Luzon).

Decorations:  Philippine President Unit Citation (streamer embroidered 17 October 1944 - 4 July 1945).


34th Inf Div patch
34th Inf Div

North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, and Minnesota Army National Guard

Worn from:  29 October 1918 - Late 1930's.



34th Inf Div patch 2
34th Inf Div2

Army National Guard

Worn from:  10 February 1941 - 3 November 1945.

Re-designated as the Thirty-fourth Command Headquarters.  Worn from:  21 February 1950 - 20 June 1990.

Re-designated as the Thirty-fourth Infantry Division.  Worn from:  20 June 1990 - Current.

The Division was organized in August 1917 at Camp Cody in Deming, New Mexico, from the National Guards of Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota.  The patch shape simulates an olla (Mexican water flask) symbolizing the Thirty-fourth Division's origin.  The bull skull also symbolizes the surrounding dry, desert-like area.  Black denotes durability, firmness, and stability while red represents courage and action.

Campaigns:  World War I, World War II (Tunisia, Naples-Foggia, Anzio, Rome-Arno, North Apennines, Po Valley).

Decorations:  French Croix de Guerre with Palm -- World War II (streamer embroidered Belvedere), Distinguished Unit Citation (streamer embroidered Mt. Pantano, Italy).

35th Inf Div patch 2
35th Inf Div

Missouri Army National Guard

Worn from:  29October 1918 - 7 December 1945.

Re-designated as the Thirty-fifth Engineer Brigade.  Worn from:  21 February 1950 - 19 January 1984.

Re-designated as the Thirty-fifth Command Headquarters.  Worn from:  19 January 1984 - 27 August 1984.

Re-designated as the Thirty-fifth Infantry Division.  Worn form: 27 August 1984 - Current.

The Thirty-fifth Division was organized in August 1917 at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma.  The Santa Fe cross was a symbol used to mark the old Santa Fe trail, an area where the unit trained.  The Santa Fe cross was officially designated as an identifying device for the unit by Headquarters, Thirty-fifth Division, on 27 March 1918.

Campaigns:  World War I (Meuse-Argonne, Alsace 1918, Lorraine 1918), World War II (Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe).


36th Inf Div patch
36th Inf Div
 

Texas Army National Guard

Worn from:  12 November 1918 - Late 1930's.


71st Abn Inf Bde  patch
71st Abn Inf Bde

Texas Army National Guard

Worn from:  25 November 1940 - 15 December 1945.

Re-designated as the Seventy-first Airborne Infantry Brigade.  Worn from:  1968 - 1973.

The design of the insignia, originally approved for the Thirty-sixth Division in 1918, was re-designated for the Seventy-first Infantry Brigade in 1968.  The Thirty-sixth Division was organized from the National Guard of Texas and Oklahoma at Camp Bowie, Texas.  The "Panther" or "Lone Star Division" chose a flint arrowhead to represent the State of Oklahoma (once an Indian Territory) where it trained and a "T" for Texas.

Campaigns:  World War I (Meuse-Argonne), World War II (Naples- Foggia, Anzio, Rome-Arno, Southern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe).

Decorations:  French Croix de Guerre with Palm -- World War II (streamer embroidered Vosges).

 



36th Inf Div Summer patch
36th Inf Div Summer

 

Texas Army National Guard

Worn from:  25 November 1940 - 9 September 1943.



16th Engr Bde patch
16th Engr Bde

Ohio Army National Guard

Worn from:  5 November 1918 - 2 March 1950.

Re-designated as the Sixteenth Engineer Brigade.  Worn from:  2 March 1950 - 11 December 1969.

The Thirty-seventh Division was organized from the National Guard of Ohio and West Virginia at Camp Sheridan, Alabama and arrived in France in 1918.  Soldiers of the Buckeye Division selected a red and white disk which appears in the state flag of Ohio.

Campaigns:  World War I, World War II (Luzon, Northern Solomons).

Decorations:  Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (streamer embroidered 17 October 1944 - 4 July 1945).

38th Inf Div
38th Inf Div

Indiana Army National Guard

Worn from:  30 October 1918 - Current.

The Thirty-eighth Division was organized with troops from Indiana, Kentucky, and West Virginia in August 1917 at Camp Shelby, Mississippi.    During training, a storm leveled all of the division's tents and they subsequently became known as the "Cyclone Division;" hence the "CY" on the insignia.

Campaigns:  World War I, World War II (New Guinea,, Leyte, Luzon).

Decorations:  Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (streamer embroidered 17 October 1944 - 4 July 1945).


39th Inf Div patch
39th Inf Div

Army National Guard

Date approved:  8 February 1922.

The monogram "D" and the triangle, representing the Greek letter delta, or "D," both suggest the name "Delta Division" which was named in honor of the men from the Mississippi Delta  area (Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi) from which the original division was organized during World War I.  The colors red, white, and blue are the national colors and gray is traditionally associated with southern states.  The division was never activated.

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