Military Infantry Division Patches

Page 3 of 12
Information extracted from the book
"US ARMY PATCHES"
by Barry Jason Stein
Used by permission

Divisions either organized before or during World War I did not use the designation "infantry."  The re-designation of these divisions as infantry came sometime after World War I when the divisions' structure was reorganized to include specialists in a wide variety of functions.  A standard infantry division of the World War II era, for example, was designed for open warfare and, consequently, a pool of motor transport and artillery were assigned to them.  It was this combined-arms formation that gained permanent status.  Specialized combat or logistical support was provided by corps and army-level units.  Beside the infantry division, motorized and airborne divisions were formed as well as a light (truck) division, a light (jungle) division, and a mountain division.  The airborne division was initially a miniature version of the infantry division with the addition of a small antiaircraft battalion, one parachute, and two glider regiments.

Information extracted from the book "US ARMY PATCHES"  by Barry Jason Stein

USED BY PERMISSION


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21st Abn Div patch
21st Abn Div

Date approved:  3 August 1944.

The blue background is the color of infantry.  Two lightning bolts, two issuing from a white cloud in the upper portion of the patch and one from a cloud underneath, indicate "21," the unit's designation.


22nd Inf Div patch
22nd Inf Div

Date approved:  3 August 1944.

A golden scorpion represents lethal killing power.  The red background represents danger and is a warning to the enemy of the bloodshed that results from the sting of this division in battle.


23rd Inf Div patch
23rd Inf Div

Worn from:  20 December 1943 - 12 December 1945 (American Division), 1 December 1954 - 29 November 1971 (Twenty-third Infantry Division).

The American Division was activated in May 1942 in New Caledonia.  The division was named for the American troops ("Ameri") who formed their unit in New Caledonia ("Cal").  The four white stars on the blue field are symbolic of the Southern Cross, under which the organization has served.

Campaigns:  World War II (Guadalcanal, Northern Solomons, Leyte, Southern Philippines), Vietnam (Counteroffensive Phases II/IV/V/VI/VII, Tet and Tet/69 Counteroffensives, Summer-Fall 1969, Sanctuary Counteroffensive, Winter-Spring 1970, Consolidation I).

Decorations:  Presidential Unit Citation -- Navy (streamer embroidered Guadalcanal), Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (streamer embroidered 17 October 1944 - 4 July 1945), Republic of Vietnam Crosses of Gallantry with Palm (streamers embroidered Vietnam, 1969; Vietnam, 1970; and Vietnam, 1971).


Hawaiian Div patch
Hawaiian Div

Worn from:  9 September 1921 - 26 August 1941.

Also known by the designation "Hawaiian Cadre."  A taro leaf symbolizes the island of Hawaii.  There is no record of official approval for this patch.

24th Inf Div patch
24th Inf Div

Worn from:  26 August 1941 - Current.

The taro leaf is a well-known symbol of Hawaii, the place where the Twenty-fourth division was constituted 1 February 1921 in the Regular Army as Headquarters, Hawaiian Division, and activated at Schofield Barracks in March 1921.  The Hawaiian Division was reorganized and re-designated the Twenty-fourth Infantry Division in October 1941.

Current location:  Fort Stewart, Georgia.

Campaigns:  World War II (Central Pacific, New Guinea, Leyte, Luzon, Southern Philippines), Korean War (UN Defensive, UN Offensive, CCF Intervention, First UN Counteroffensive, CCF Spring Offensive, UN Summer-Fall Offensive, Second Winter, Summer 1953), Armed Forces Expeditions (Panama, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait).

Decorations:  Presidential Unit Citation -- Army (streamer embroidered Defense of Korea), Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (streamer embroidered 17 October 1944 - 4 July 1945), Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations (streamers embroidered Pyongtaek, and Korea).


25th Inf Div patch
25th Inf Div

Worn from:  15 September 1944 - Current.

Activated at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii.  The taro leaf is indicative of the origin of the Twenty-fifth Infantry Division in the Hawaiian Islands, while the lightning flash is representative of the manner in which the division performs its assignments.  During the Vietnam War, the division was given the nickname Cu Chi National Guard because the division headquarters and the majority of its elements were stationed at Cu Chi throughout the war.  Another nickname for the Twenty-fifth is represen- tative of the psychedelic sixties era.  They were frequently called the "Electric Strawberry," the name referring to the division's "Tropic Lightning" patch.

Current location:  Schofield Barracks, Hawaii and Fort Lewis, Washington.

Campaigns:  World War II (Central Pacific, Guadalcanal, Northern Solomons, Luzon), Korean War (UN Defense, UN Offensive, CCF Intervention, First UN Counteroffensive, CCF Spring Offensive, UN Summer-Fall Offensive, Second Winter, Summer-Fall 1952, Third Winter, Summer 1953), Vietnam Counteroffensive and Phases II/III/IV/V/VI/VII, Tet and Tet/69 Counteroffensives, Sanctuary Counteroffensive, Summer-Fall 1969).

Decorations:  Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (streamer embroidered 17 October 1944 - 4 July 1945), Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citations (streamers embroidered Masan-Chinju, and Munsan-NI), Meritorious Unit Commendation -- Army (streamer embroidered Vietnam 1969), Republic of Vietnam Crosses of Gallantry with Palm (streamers embroidered Vietnam 1966 - 1968, and 1968 - 1970), Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal -- First Class (streamer embroidered Vietnam 1966 - 1970).

26th Inf Div patch
26th Inf Div

Massachusetts Army National Guard

Worn from:  26 October 1918 - 1993.

The Twenty-sixth Division was the first of the National Guard divisions and was formed from the National Guard of the New England States.  The National Guard was called into federal service in 1917 and drafted into the service under the provision of the National Defense Act of 1916.  The New England Guard went to camp in their respective states, remaining there until departure for France.  The "YD" monogram refers to the name "Yankee Division," given them while in France.

Campaigns:  World War I (Champagne-Marne, Aisne-Marne, St.-Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Ile-de-France 1918, Lorraine 1918), World War II (Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe).

Decorations:  Cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action in the Ardennes.


27th Inf Bde patch
27th Inf Bde

New York Army National Guard

Worn from:  29 October 1918 - 31 December 1945 and 2 February 1950 - 15 February 1955.

Re-designated:  Twenty-seventh Infantry Brigade.  Worn from:  4 May 1986 - Current.

The monogram "NY" stands for the unit's home state of New York.  The constellation of Orion was placed on the patch as a compliment to the organization's World War I commander, Major General J. F. O'Ryan.  The two letters, together with the seven stars of the constellation of Orion, indicate the numerical designation of the brigade.

Campaigns:  World War I (Ypres-Lys, Somme Offensive), World War II (Central Pacific, western Pacific, Ryukyus, Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe, Bismarck Archipelago, Leyte, Luzon, Southern Philippines), Armed Forces Expeditions (Panama).

Decorations:  Meritorious Unit Commendation -- Army (streamer  embroidered European Theater), Philippine Presidential Unit Citation (streamer embroidered 17 October 1944 - 4 July 1045).



28th Inf Div  patch
28th Inf Div 

Pennsylvania Army National Guard

Worn from:  19 October 1918 - Current.

Organized in March 1879 at Philadelphia as Headquarters, Division of the National Guard of Pennsylvania and drafted into federal service in August 1917.  The keystone, symbol of the state of Pennsylvania, refers to the nickname of the division received during service in World War I.  An alternative nickname, again with reference to the shape and color of the patch, is "The Bucket of Blood."

Campaigns:  World War I (Champagne-Marne, Aisne-Marne, Oise-Aisne, Meuse-Argonne, Champagne 1918, Lorraine 1918), World War II (Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe).

Decorations:  Luxembourg Croix de Guerre (streamer embroidered Luxembourg), Meritorious Unit Commendation -- Army (streamer embroidered European Theater).


29th Inf Div patch
29th Inf Div

Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and District of Columbia Army National Guard

Worn from:  21 October 1918 - Current.

In 1919, when shoulder-sleeve insignia were first authorized, the Twenty-ninth was composed of two masses of men, one from the north and the other from the south.  In deference to the Civil War, the north is represented by the blue and the south by the gray.  This is also the Asian symbol for yin and yang, but without the traditional colors.

Campaigns:  World War I (Meuse-Argonne, Alsace, 1918), World War II (Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Central Europe).

Decorations:  French Croix de Guerre with Palm -- World War II (streamer embroidered Beaches of Normandy).


30th Inf Div patch
30th Inf Div

North Carolina Army National Guard

Worn horizontally from:  23 October 1918 - 1943.



30th Inf Bde patch
30th Inf Bde

North Carolina Army National Guard

Worn from:  1943 - 25 November 1945 and 22 June 1955 - 13 September 1974.

Re-designated as the Thirtieth Infantry Brigade.  Worn from:  1 December 1973 - 1994.

Organized in August 1917 at Camp Sevier, South Carolina, with troops from North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.  The design of the insignia was originally approved in 1918 for the Thirtieth Division which was known as the "Old Hickory Division," taken from the nickname of the famous Tennessean, Andrew Jackson.  The letters "OH" are the initials of "Old Hickory," and the roman numeral for thirty indicate the numerical designation of the organization.

Campaigns:  World War I (Somme Offensive, Ypres-Lys, Flanders 1918), World War II (Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe).

Decorations:  French Croix de Guerre with Palm -- World War II (streamer embroidered France), Belgian Fourragere 1940, cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action in "Belgium" and action in the Ardennes, Meritorious Unit Commendation -- Army (streamer embroidered United Kingdom and France), French Croix de Guerre with Silver-Gilt Star -- World War II (streamer embroidered Stoumont and Habiemont.

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