Military Commands Patches

Page 8 of 9
Information extracted from the book
"US ARMY PATCHES"
by Barry Jason Stein
Used by permission


USA MC Patch
USA MC

Worn from:  29 October 1962 - 23 February 1976.

Re-designated:  Development and Readiness Command  --  United States Army.  Worn from:  23 February 1976 - 29 August 1984.

Re-designated:  Material Command -- United States Army.  Worn from:  29 August 1984 - Current.

The lozenge and white areas represent the command and control elements of the organization, with the red area used to represent the army and the blue area industry.  The white area also alludes to the flow of material through the equal and combined efforts of the army and industry as directed.


MEPCOM patch
MEP COM

Worn from:  26 October 1983 - Current.

The five corners of the pentagon allude to the five services comprising MEPCOM, the jointly staffed organization supporting all recruiting departments.  The three basic functions performed in the selective process are represented b the checky background, indicative of administrative processing, and the colors blue and red, which are symbolic of the mental and medical aspects.  The gold sword represents the high ideals inherent in the new service member.



ROTC Cadet Cmd patch
ROTC Cadet Cmd

Worn from:  8 April 1986 - Current.

The shield symbolizes the army mission of national defense and is divided into quarters to represent the four traditional military-science courses comprising Senior ROTC curriculum.  The sword signifies courage, gallantry, and self-sacrifice intrinsic to the profession of arms.  The lamp denotes the pursuit of knowledge, higher learning, and the partnership of Army ROTC with American colleges and universities.  The Greek helmet is symbolic of the ancient-civilization concept of the warrior scholar.  The motto "Leadership Excellence" expresses the ultimate responsibility  to the nation.  The tab with the inscription "Ranger Challenge" denotes a special award in competition for successfully completing the Ranger Challenge course.  Authorized for wear by personnel (less SROTC cadets) assigned to the United States Army ROTC Cadet Command.  The insignia was approved for wear by cadets effective during the 1987 - 1988 school year.



USAREC patch
USA REC

Worn from:  13 January 1967 - 5 October 1972.

The thirteen stars, representing the original states, and the Liberty Bell, indicate the United States Army Recruiting Command's role in the preservation of liberty and defense of country.


USARCOM patch
USA RCOM

Worn from:  24 June 1991 - Current.

The two eagles' heads are in reference to the unit's motto, "Twice the Citizen," and their reserve mission.  The eagle faces in the directions, denoting vigilance and a wide-ranging scope of ability and expertise. Red, white, and blue are the national colors; gold stands for excellence.


USA Space Cmd patch
USA Space Cmd

Worn from:  17 August 1983 - Current.

Gold denotes excellence, achievement, and high ideals.  Red, white, and blue, our national colors, convey courage, sincerity, and loyalty.  The flight symbol represents space, the unit's theater of operations; the pheon symbolizes a strong defense and military preparedness.


USA ISC patch
USA ISC

Worn from:  8 May 1964 - 31 October 1973.

Re-designated:  Communications Command -- United States Army. Worn from:  31 October 1973 - 5 September 1984.

Re-designated:  Information Systems Command -- United States Army.  Worn from:  5 September 1984 - Current.

The colors orange and white are representative of the Signal Corps.  The globe indicates the worldwide nature of the communications controlled by the command; the lightning depicts its dynamic and strategic capabilities.


USA SDC patch
USA SDC

Worn from:  15 January 1969 - 31 October 1973.

Re-designated:  Ballistic Missile Defense Organization -- United States Army.  Worn from:  31 October 1973 - 30 December 1985.

Re-designated:  Strategic Defense Command -- United States Army.  Worn from:  30 December 1985 - Current.

The colors scarlet and yellow traditionally are associated with artillery, and  light blue represents the sky.  The sentinel denotes readiness and alertness, representing the organization as guardian of the nation's skies.  The headquarters for the unit is at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.


USA TECOM Patch
USA TECOM

Worn from:  24 January 1989 - 20 November 1990.

Re-designated:  Operational Test and Evaluation Command -- United States Army.  Worn from:  20 November 1990 - Current.

The command's mission, to seek truth through testing and experimentation, is symbolized by the triangle or fulcrum balancing a bar and sun.  The bar and triangle represent a scale, the sun signifies the search for knowledge, enlightenment, and high ideals.  Yellow is indicative of the precious metal gold and represents "the worth of quality assurance of tested products."  Dark blue alludes to the sky and space, suggesting the possibilities and discoveries of the future/  The red sword characterizes  the individual soldier, whose combat preparedness is aided by the data and information products the organization provides.  The white is expressive of the command's search for the truth and the sterling quality of the products produced.


Army Pers Cmd patch
Army Pers Cmd

Worn from:  24 June 1987 - 3 March 1989.

Re-designated:  Total Army Personnel Command.  Worn from:  3 March 1989 - Current.

Red, white, and blue are the national colors.  The globe symbolizes the worldwide mission of the Total Army Personnel Command.  The sword symbolizes the military nature of the organization.  The arrows indicate the worldwide personnel management policies and programs developed and maintained by the command in support of the Regular Army, the United States Reserve, the Army National Guard and Department of the Army civilians.


I Field Forces Vietnam patch
I Field Forces
Vietnam

Worn from:  8 October 1966 - 30 April 1971.

The crusader's sword (the "Sword of Freedom") was suggested by the shoulder-sleeve insignia previously authorized for the United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam and the United States Army, Vietnam.  The one diagonal refers to the numerical designation of the I Field Force.  The sword, in "piercing" the red area, alludes to the constant probing of enemy territory and positions and the driving back and crushing of enemy forces.  The colors red, white, and blue are the national colors of the United States, and the colors yellow and red are those of Vietnam.  The colors blue, red, and yellow are also those of the three major combat arms:  Infantry, artillery and armor.  The silhouette of the shield is shaped like a battle-ax to symbolize the smashing power of the I Field Force and the constant combat readiness of its personnel to engage the enemy.  The battle-ax shape, in itself, is also an additional I Field Force identification.  Headquarters was located at Nha Trang.  Major United States forces under I Field Force, Vietnam control included:  The First Cavalry Division; the Fourth Infantry Division; Third Brigade, Twenty-fifth Infantry Division; First Brigade, 101st Airborne Division; and the 173rd Airborne Brigade.


II Field Forces Vietnam patch
II Field Forces
Vietnam

Worn from:  4 October 1966 - 30 April 1971.

The crusader's sword (the "Sword of Freedom") was suggested by the shoulder-sleeve insignia previously authorized for the United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam and the United States Army, Vietnam.  The colors red, white, and blue are the national colors of the United States, and the colors yellow and red are those of Vietnam.  The colors blue, red, and yellow are also those of the three major combat arms:  Infantry, artillery, and armor.  II Field Force, Vietnam with head - quarters at Bien Hoa and Long Binh became the largest army combat command in Vietnam.  Major United States forces under II Field Force, Vietnam control included the Capital Military Assistance Command, Vietnam; First Cavalry Division; First Infantry Division; Ninth Infantry Division; Twenty-fifth Infantry Divisions; 173rd Airborne Brigade; 196th Infantry Brigade; 199th Infantry Brigade; and the Eleventh Armored Cavalry Regiment.