Military Commands Patches

Page 7 of 9
Information extracted from the book
"US ARMY PATCHES"
by Barry Jason Stein
Used by permission


af south patch

AF SOUTH

Worn from:  1946 - 1954.

The patch is composed of a lion (symbolizing St. Mark) holding a sword and resting on the book of peace (pax).  This shows that NATO nations desire peace but are prepared for war.


AF CENT Staff Patch

AF CENT Staff

Worn from:  Late 1951 - October 1989.

Represented on the patch is the tower of Charlemagne, the first leader of a unified Western Europe.  The sword alludes to Charlemagne.  The Latin inscription attributed to Charlemagne reads, "I fight against aggression and punish the aggressor."


 AF CENT Army Patch

AF CENT Army

Worn from:  Late 1951 - October 1989.

Represented on the patch is the tower of Charlemagne, the first leader of a unified Western Europe.  The sword alludes to Charlemagne.  The Latin inscription, attributed to Charlemagne, reads, "I fight against aggression and punish the aggressor."

Note:  In addition to the two designs above, air force personnel wear the patch with a light blue background; navy personnel wear the patch with a dark blue background.


LAND SOUTH EAST Patch

LAND SOUTH EAST

Worn from:  29 October 1952 - October 1989.

The cross is a heraldic device representing Greece.  The star and crescent is a heraldic device representing Turkey and, together with the colors, represents the flags and coat of arms of these nations.



SHAPE Patch

SHAPE

Worn from:  1960 - Current.

This patch is worn by United States forces assigned to NATO Headquarters, Brussels, Belgium.  Two swords pointing skyward meet at their points to form the letter "A," which represents the strength of the Allied forces.  The original twelve nations that formed the NATO alliance are represented by the blue and silver fronds emanating from the swords.  The olive branches at the bottom are the symbol for peace.  The green background suggests the green fields and woods of Europe.  Vivlia pretum libertatis is Latin for "Vigilance is the price of liberty."


USARAK Patch

USARAK

Worn from:  5 March 1943 - 1 March 1949.

Re-designated:  Alaska Headquarters -- United States Army.  Worn from:  1 March 1949 - 1994.

Re-designated:  Alaska -- United States Army.  Worn from:  1994 - Current.

The insignia represents the constellation Ursa Major (the Great Bear), which, according to ancient myth, is the guardian of the North Star (Polaris).  The golden yellow star represents the North Star.  The design was originally approved for the Alaskan Defense Command in 1943 and re-designated in 1949 for the Headquarters, United States Army Alaska.


7581st USA Res Garrison1 Patch

7581st USA Res Garrison1

Worn from:  9 September 1942 - 3 April 1944.

Re-designated:  Antilles Department.  Worn from:  3 April 1944 - 2 February 1948.

Re-designated:  Antilles -- United States Forces.  Worn from:  2 February 1948 - 1 May 1981.

Reassigned:  7581st United States Army Reserve Garrison.  Worn from:  1 May 1981 - Current.

The patch depicts the famous Morro Castle in San Juan, Puerto Rico.  The colors red and gold are associated with the Spanish heritage of the island.

Hawaii SUPCOM Patch

Hawaii SUPCOM

Worn from:  10 January 1022 - 14 August 1944.

Re-designated:  Central Pacific Base Command.  Worn from:  14 August 1944 - 1947.

Re-designated:  Hawaii -- United States Army Support Command.  Worn from:  1947 - 15 July 1957.

Re-designated:  Hawaii -- United States Army.  Worn from:  15 July 1957 - 6 December 1972.

Re-designated:  Hawaii -- United States Army Support Command.  Worn from:  6 September 1972 - Current.

A stylized "H" represents Hawaii, and the eight sides of the patch represent the eight islands of Hawaii.  Scarlet and yellow represent the royal Hawaiian colors.


USARPAC Patch

USARPAC

Worn from:  18 October 1944 - 18 February 1947.

Re-designated:  Pacific -- Army Ground Forces.  Worn from:  18 February 1947 - 15 August 1974.

Re-designated:  Pacific -- United States Army.  Worn from:  15 August 1974 - 29 March 1979.

Re-designated:  Western Command -- United States Army.  Worn from:  29 March 1979 - 30 August 1990.Re-designated:  Pacific -- United States Army.  Worn from:  30 August 1990 - Current.

The arrow is representative of the strength and valor of the armed forces of the United States.  It points from Hawaii toward the Japanese mainland.  The location of the Pacific Ocean areas is indicated by Polaris, the seven stars of Ursa Major, and the constellation of the Southern Cross.


Panama Canal Dept Patch

Panama Canal Dept

Worn from:  16 August 1922 - 1941.

The design represents the Isthmus of Panama.  The colors red and yellow represent the Spanish heritage of the area.

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