Military Assistance Patches History

Page 7 of 8
Information extracted from the book
"US ARMY PATCHES"
by Barry Jason Stein
Used by permission


Armed Forces Network Korea Patch

AFN Korea
 

Worn from:  1970's.

Approved for local wear only.

The inscription indicates broadcasting in radio as well as the just-emerging medium of television, destined to change the field of news broadcasting forever.


AFN Vietnam Patch

AFN Vietnam
 

Worn from:  1960's - 1970's.

The unit's designation incorporates the design of a television camera., which brought the war into the homes of Americans and the world.  The consequences of the new technology as it was employed in reporting the war had a dramatic impact on the outcome of that conflict and was to be repeated with even more impact and drama when the CNN network went live with Operation Desert Storm.  AN entire war, broadcast twenty-four hours a day, was brought into the living rooms and bedrooms of the world. Volumes will be written on this kind of war news coverage before a verdict can be reached on its effect on the outcome of wars both fought and to be fought.


Army Hostess an Librarian Svc Patch

Army Hostess an
Librarian Svc

Worn from:  1944 - 1947.

The colors suggest the branches of service and the men this service supported.  This unit was, in fact, a component of the Morale Division of the Adjutant General's office.  The service was romanticized by Hollywood in such motion pictures as, "Stage Door Canteen."


USO Patch

USO

Worn from:  1941 - Unknown.

The organization was formed to provide entertainment to servicemen at training camps and in combat.  The organization enlisted the aid of many top-ranking stars of stage, screen, and radio and put them into uniform as part of the USO Camp Shows.  The men and women of the USO knew danger and hardship were in their mission to provide respite from the war for the United States Armed Forces, and twenty - eight of these entertainers are listed by the department of defense as having been killed in the line of duty.


USAF Band Chorus 2 Patch

USAF Band Chorus Patch

 USAF Band Chorus

 

Worn from:  28 June 1951 - 10 October 1985.

The Iyre, an ancient, stringed musical instrument, is the army symbol for musicians.  The patch, in the form of a pentagon, alludes to the unit's association with army headquarters.  The tab indicates the unit's designation.  Also shown is the tab for the chorus, which was part of the band.  The two units provided music for major functions and ceremonies in and around the District of Columbia.


USA K9 Svc Patch

USA K9 Svc

Worn from:  Unknown (Unauthorized).

The patch for the Canine Corps is abbreviated in the inscription "K-9."  The figure of a dog is superimposed over crossed rifles, symbolic of the military nature of the dog's work.  The inscription, "Hell on Paws," is a humorous reference to the unauthorized inscription on the Second Armor Division shoulder-sleeve insigni, "Hell on Wheels."

 

Mil Forces Jap War Crimes Patch

Mil Forces
Jap War Crimes
 

Worn from:  1945 - 1946.

Approved for local wear only.

The scales and the lightning bolts suggest swift justice.  The samurai sword represents the Japanese war criminals who were on trial.  The three stars represent the United States, Great Britain, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.   This special patch was worn by United States personnel attending the war crimes tail in Tokyo.


Nuremberg Dist War Crimes Patch

Nuremberg
Dist War Crimes

Worn from:  Late 1940's (Unauthorized).

Approved for local wear only.

This insignia, also known as the Nuremberg District, shows the scales of justice weighing down on the Nazi swastika.  The National Socialist emblem is broken up into four parts, alluding to the four occupying powers and the zones they controlled.  Red, white, and blue are the national colors of the United States.  This special patch was worn by United States personnel attending the war crimes trial in Nuremberg.


UN Staff Patch

UN Staff
San Francisco

Worn from:  26 June 1945 - 1947.

While the significance of the flags of the countries shown could not be determined, it appears that the "staff" referred to in the title of the patch comes from countries that include Great Britain, France, Nationalist China, Denmark, and Czechoslovakia.


UN Staff San Francisco 2 Patch

 UN Staff
San Francisco 2

Worn from:  26 June 1945 - 1947.

While the significance of the flags of the countries shown could not be determined, it appears that the "staff" referred to in the title of the patch comes from countries that include Great Britain, France, Nationalist China, Denmark, and Czechoslovakia.

 


 

UN Staff San Francisco 3 Patch

UN Staff
San Francisco 3

Worn from:  26 June 1945 - 1947.

While the significance of the flags of the countries shown could not be determined, it appears that the "staff" referred to in the title of the patch comes from countries that include Great Britain, France, Nationalist China, Denmark, and Czechoslovakia.

 


UN Honor Guard Patch

 UN Honor Guard


Worn from:  26 June 1945 - 1947.

Light blue and white are the colors of the United Nations.  The globe and the olive branch comprise the symbol for the United Nations, and the inscription on the tab is the unit's designation.