Military Assistance Patches History

Page 2 of 8
Information extracted from the book
"US ARMY PATCHES"
by Barry Jason Stein
Used by permission


MAAG Laos patch

MAAG Laos

Worn from:  1950 - 1971.

Approved for local wear only.

The colors and the elephant design are from the Laotian flag.  The inscription is the unit's designation.


Mil TNG Mission patch

Mil TNG Mission
to Saudi Arabia

Worn from:  1970's.

The inscription indicates the unit's designation, while the crossed swords and palm tree are from the Saudi Arabian coat of arms.


USA Mil Gp patch

USA Mil Gp
El Salvador


Worn from:  18=982 - December 1994.

Approved for local wear only.

The origin and significance of the design is unknown.


USA Mission patch

USA Mission
 

Worn from:  22 May 1952 - Current.

The design of the insignia, a constellation of thirteen white stars upon a blue hexafoil, is adapted from the seal of the United States.  This insignia is worn by personnel assigned to Mission duties in overseas areas.  The patch, when worn with a tab above, signified a "MAAG" or Military Assistance Advisory Group.  In all, there were forty four different MAAG's between 1946 and 1960.  Following are a few examples.


MAAG Indochina  patch

MAAG Indochina

Worn from:  June 1954 - 11 November 1956.

Approved for local wear only.

Worn by personnel assigned to the army mission in Indochina.  Personnel of the MAAG-Indochina arrived in Vietnam 17 September 1950 and departed 31 October 1955.  The group, located in the Cholon district of Saigon, had the mission of giving advisor support to Laos, Vietnam, and Cambodia.

 
MAAG Laos patch 2

MAAG Laos 2

Dates worn:  1950's.

Approved for local wear only.

Worn by personnel assigned to the army mission in Laos.


vcss valadation icon

MAAG Thailand

Worn from:  1950's.

Approved for local wear only.

Worn by personnel assigned to the army mission in Thailand.


MAAG Vietnam patch

MAAG Vietnam

Worn from:  April 1956 - march 1965.

Approved for local wear only.

Worn by personnel assigned to the army mission in Vietnam.  The group, which replaced MAAG-Indochina, arrived in Vietnam on 1 November 1955 and departed on 15 May 1964.  During this group's service, military advisor strength was increased from 746 in 1961 to over 3,400 at the beginning of 1963.  They were replaced in 1962 by United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (MACV).


Civil Assist Cmd Korea patch

Civil Assist Cmd Korea

Worn from:  November 1953 - Unknown.

Approved for local wear only.

The shield, a symbol of defense, incorporates the national colors of the United States (red, white, and blue) with the taeguk on a white background that represents the flag of South Korea.  The hand-of- friendship design is taken from markings placed on supplies and equipment donated by the people of the United States of America to other nations around the world.


MAC Thailand patch

MAC Thailand
 

Worn from:  1950's.

Approved for local wear only.

The inscription at the top of the insignia is the unit's designation.  Below, the red, white, and blue shield of the United States of America is superimposed on the flag of Thailand.



MACV patch

 MACV

Worn from:  5 March 1963 - 31 January 1978.

Yellow and red are the colors of Vietnam.  The red ground alludes to the infiltration and aggression from beyond the embattled wall (i.e., the Great Wall of China).  The opening in the wall, through which this infiltration and aggression flows, is blocked by the sword represent- ing United States military aid and support.  The wall is arched and the sword is pointed upward in reference to the offensive action pushing the aggressors back.  Military Assistance Command -- Vietnam, also known as Pentagon East, arrived in Vietnam 8 February 1962, absorbed Military Assistance Advisory Group-Vietnam, and departed 29 march 1973.  The headquarters was at Tan Son Nhut, Saigon.


 HQUSEUCOM Patch

  HQUSEUCOM

Worn from:  January 1984 - Current.

Approved for local wear only.

The origin and significance of the design is unknown.