Military Airborne Inf  Patches History

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Information extracted from the book "US ARMY PATCHES"  by Barry Jason Stein

USED BY PERMISSION



505th PIR
505th PIR patch

Worn from:  July 1942 - December 1948 (Unauthorized).

The unit was assigned to the Eighty-second Airborne Division.  The black panther is found on the shield of the regiment's coat of arms and symbolizes stealth, speed, and courage -- all characteristics of a good parachutist.  The wings are added to represent entry into combat via air.  This unit participated in the first regimental combat attack in Sicily.  The motto "H-MINUS" has long been used by the men of the regiment and indicates that they are always prepared for combat, and usually enter before the main ground or amphibious attack, which is timed on the traditional "H: hour.

Campaigns:  World War II (Sicily, Naples-Foggia, Normandy, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe).

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation (streamer embroidered Ste Mere Eglise); French Croix de Guerre with Palm (streamer embroidered Ste Mere Eglise, Cotentin); cited in the Order of the Day, Belgian army, for the Ardennes, Belgium, and Germany; Belgian Fourragere 1940; The Netherlands Military Order of William (streamer embroidered Nijmegen) 1944; The Netherlands Orange Lanyard, all companies Second Battalion entitled to Distinguished Unit Citation (streamer embroidered Nijmegen).

505th PIR patch 2
505th PIR 2


Worn from:  1948 - 1957 (Unauthorized).

The unit was a component of the Eighty-second Airborne Division.


1st Abn Battle Gp 505th Abn Regt patch
1st Abn Battle Gp
505th abn Regt

 

Worn from:  1948 - 1957 (Unauthorized).

The unit was assigned to the Eighty-second Airborne Division.  The winged black panther and the four bendlets are taken from the distinctive insignia of the unit symbolizing stealth, speed, and courage and the four parachutes represent drops into combat during World War II.

1st Abn Battle Gp 505th HG patch
1st Abn Battle Gp
505th HG

Worn from:  Late 1950's (Unauthorized).

The unit was assigned to the Eighty-second Airborne Division.  The design is taken from the shield of the regiment and incorporates the inscription "Honor Guard."


1st Abn Battle Gp 505th Inf Regt patch
1st Abn Battle Gp
505th Inf Regt

Worn from:  1952 - 1957 (Unauthorized).

The unit was assigned to the Eighty-second Airborne Division.  This design incorporates a winged black panther and the motto "H MINUS" from the shield of the regiment's coat of arms.  The black panther represents stealth, speed, and courage.  The wings are added to represent entry into combat via air.

506th PIR patch

506th PIR

Worn from:  July 1942 - November 1945 (Unauthorized).

The unit was assigned to the 101st Airborne Division.  A pair of dicce, showing a five and a six, ringed by a black "O," and superimposed on a parachute represent the unit's designation (506th Parachute Infantry Regiment).  It was on Currahee Mountain that the men of the 506th were hardened sufficiently to enable the regiment to break the world march record held by the Japanese army.  The 506th gained nationwide attention for this feat.

Campaigns:  World War II (Normandy, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe).  Note:  Companies K, L, and M are entitled to campaign streamers for World War I and World War II in units since re-designated.

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation (streamer embroidered Bastogne, Normandy); cited in the Order of the Day, Belgian army, for France-Belgium, Bastogne; Belgian Fourragere 1940; French Croix de Guerre with Palm (streamer embroidered Normandy); Netherlands Orange Lanyard.  Note:  Company K (then battery D, 463rd Parachute Field Artillery Battalion) entitled to French Croix de Guerre with Silver Star (streamer embroidered Muy En Province).

506th Abn Inf Regt patch
506th Abn Inf Regt

Worn from:  December 1951 - December 1953; May 1954 - April 1957 (Unauthorized).

The unit was assigned to the 101st Airborne Division.  The design is an embroidered replica of the distinctive insignia of the unit.  The blue field is for the infantry.  The thunderbolt indicates the regiment's threat and particular technique of attack:  striking with speed, power, and surprise from the sky.  The six parachute indicate that the 506th was the sixth parachute regiment activated in the United States Army.  The green silhouette represents Currahee Mountain, the site of the regiment's activation (Toccoa, Georgia).  "Currahee" is the Cherokee equivalent for "stands alone," a trait for which the paratrooper is renowned.  "Currahee!" was the cry of the 506th paratroopers as they cleared the door on their first jump, and it will continue to be their cry when in combat.



507th PIR patch
507th PIR

Worn from:  April 1943 - January 1944 (Unauthorized).

An element of the First Airborne Infantry Brigade.

Reassigned to the Eighty-second Airborne Division January 1944 - August 1944.

Reassigned to the Seventeenth Airborne Division August 1944 - March 1945.  The design is a caricature of a spider descending from the sky, holding a lightning bolt and a bomb with a lit fuse.  The special boots, originally designed by the Corcoran Boot Company, allude to the pride paratroopers take in their special footwear.  Stories abound of bloodied noses and broken bones when "non-airborne" soldiers have been caught wearing these elite symbols of airborne pride.

Campaigns:  World War II (Normandy, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe).

Decorations:  Distinguished Unit Citation (streamer embroidered Cotentin Peninsula); French Croix de Guerre with Palm (streamer embroidered Ste Mere Eglise, Cotentin); French Fourragere.


504th Abn Inf Regt patch
507th Abn Inf Reg

Worn from:  June 1948 - May 1949 (Unauthorized).

The unit was assigned to the Seventeenth Airborne Division and is currently a training unit at Fort Benning, Georgia. The design is an embroidered replica of the distinctive insignia of the unit.


507th Abn Inf Regt patch 2
507th Abn Inf Regt 2

Worn from:  June 1948 - May 1949 (Unauthorized).

The unit was assigned to the Seventeenth Airborne Division.  It is currently a training unit at Fort Benning, Georgia.  The design is an embroidered replica of the distinctive insignia of the unit.  The open parachute symbolizes the function of the regiment and the lightning flash indicates the speed with which their duties are performed.  "Down to Earth" is the unit's motto.  The design was approved 21 January 1943.

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