Army National Guard Patches History

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Prior to 30 December 1983, the units described below were designated Headquarters and Headquarters
Detachment Army National Guard.  Since 30 December 1983, these units have been re-designated Headquarters,
State Area Command, Army National Guard.  Under the National Defense Act of 1916, the United States Army was organized into three components; the regular army, the reserves, and the national guard.

Information extracted from the book "US ARMY PATCHES"  by Barry Jason Stein

USED BY PERMISSION



 New Hampshire

Worn from:  30 April 1959 - Current.

The bundle of five arrows are from the seal adopted by the colony of New Hampshire in 1776.



New Jersey

Worn from:  12 October 1955 - Current.

The original settlement in New Jersey were English and Dutch.  The coats of arms of both countries hear lions.  The original proprietor was Sir George Carteret, whose arms are the four red lozenges.  As the settlement was predominately of English origin, the twists of the wreath are white and red.



New Mexico
1stDesign

Worn from:  17 June 1955 - 7 March 1975.

The Zia Sun, as adaptation of the ancient American Indian symbol of perfect friendship among united cultures, was suggested by the state flag of New Mexico.  Red and yellow (gold) are colors of Old Spain.



New Mexico
2nd Design

Worn from:  7 March 1975 - Current.

The Zia Sun, ancient American Indian symbol of perfect friendship among united cultures, was suggested by the state flag of New Mexico.  Red and yellow, colors of Old Spain, represent the early settlement of the are by the Spanish.



New York
1st Design

Worn from:  10 November 1948 - 12 December 1949.

The ship is Henry Hudson's, the "Half Moon," in which he discovered and explored the Hudson River in 1609.  From 12 December 1949 - 5 August 1959, this insignia was manufactured and worn by approval of local authority but was unauthorized.



New York
2nd Design

Worn from:  5 August 1949 - 26 January 1994.

The ship is Henry Hudson's, the "Half Moon," in which he discovered and explored the Hudson River in 1609.



New York
3rd Design

Worn from:  26 January 1994 - Current.

New York State is represented by the crown, recalling the crown on the Statue of Liberty, symbol of the city and state, which emphasizes the traditional freedoms long associated with New York.  The sword represents the National Guard and denotes readiness.  Blue refers to the many waterways and natural water resources of New York and is taken from the state flag.  Red reflects courage; gold if for excellence.



North Carolina

Worn from:  22 May 1963 - Current.

The first flag of North Carolina, June 1775, bore a hornet's nest and the date 20 May 1775.  Thus the hornet's nest of North Carolina antedates the American flag.



North Dakota

Worn from:    29 April 1950 - Current.

The design of the insignia, a sheaf of three white arrows armed and flighted red behind a stringed bow with red grip, is adapted from the North Dakota coat of arms.  The Indian arrowheads refer to the Sioux Indians of the area, for whom the state received it's nickname of the "Sioux State."



Ohio

Worn from:  20 March 1950 - Current.

The triangular shape design of the insignia, disc, and star are adapted from the Ohio state flag.  The buckeye, symbolized by the disc, is the seed of the state tree from which Ohio receives it's nickname of "Buckeye State."  The star represents Ohio's statehood in 1803 as the seventeenth state of the union.




Oklahoma

Worn from:  28 May 1952 - Current.

The Indian with war bonnet appears on the state seal, representing the state's ties to the Chickasaw, Creek, Choctaw, Seminole, and Cherokee American Indians and indicating Oklahoma as the last home of the native American.

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