Army National Guard  Patches History

Page 2 of 6

Information extracted from the book "US ARMY PATCHES" 
by Barry Jason Stein
USED BY PERMISSION

Prior to 30 December 1983, the units described below were designated Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment Army National Guard.  Since 30 December 1983, these units have been re-designated Headquarters, State Area Command, Army National Guard.  Under the National Defense Act of 1916, the United States Army was organized into three components; the regular army, the reserves, and the national guard.


Guam patch
Guam

 

Worn from:  31 July 1981 - Current.

The design is based on the coat of arms of Guam, showing land, sea, and sky, with an ancient flying proa (canoe) approaching the beach near the mouth of the Agana River and a palm tree in the foreground. The shape of the insignia is that of the sling stones used by the ancient Chamorros in hunting and fighting.


Hawaii patch
Hawaii

Worn from:  17 June 1948 - Current.

Kamehameha I, in red feathered helmet, was the first ruler of a united Hawaii after conquering most of the Hawaiian Islands by 1810.


Idaho1st design patch
Idaho
1st design

Worn from:  21 December 1948 - 8 August 1975.

The elk's head appeared on the first territorial seal of Idaho, adopted March 5, 1866, and was adapted (the head in white) by the Idaho Army National Guard for it's shoulder-sleeve insignia..


Idaho 2nd Design patch
Idaho
2ndDesign
 

Worn from:  8 August 1975 - Current.

The elk's head to the neck with full antlers appeared on the first territorial seal of Idaho, adopted March 5, 1866, and was adapted by the Idaho Army National Guard for it's shoulder-sleeve and distinctive-unit insignia.


Illinois patch
Illinois

Worn from:  16 February 1949 - Current.

The design is that of the silhouetted head of Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth president of the United States (1861 - 1865), who was referred to in his early political career as the "Illinois Rail-Splitter."


Indiana patch
Indiana
 

Worn from:  The design was adapted from the state flag; the star represents Indiana as the nineteenth state to join the union.


Iowa 1st design patch
Iowa
 

Worn from:  24 April 1935 - 24 September 1974.

The eagle in flight, carrying in his beak a scroll, is adapted from the state seal and flag of the state of Iowa, which is nicknamed the "hawkeye state."


Iowa 2ndDesign patch
Iowa
2ndDesign
 

Worn from:  24 September 1974 - Current.

The shape of the insignia is a reference to that of the thirty-fourth ("Red Bull") Infantry Division patch which was worn by Iowa guardsmen for approximately fifty years.  The hawk's head on the gold and blue torse is adapted from the crest of the Iowa Army National Guard.

 


Kansas patch
Kansas

Worn from:  22 October 1951 - Current.

The common sunflower, primarily native to North America, is the state flower of Kansas where it is cultivated for its edible seeds.


Kentucky 1stDesign patch
Kentucky
1stDesign
 

Worn from:  18 May 1951 - 27 December 1973.

Red, white and blue are our national colors.  The yellow, red, and blue refer to the combat arms; armor (cavalry), artillery, and infantry.  The long rifle is inseparably associated with the early history of Kentucky prior to and after its admission to the union as the fifteenth state.  The quill, symbol of administrative functions, refers to the headquarters element of the guard.


Kentucky 2ndDesign patch
Kentucky
2ndDesign
 

Worn from:  27 December 1973 - Current.

Red, white, and blue are our national colors.  The yellow, red, and blue refer to the combat arms; armor (cavalry), artillery, and infantry.  The long rifle is inseparably associated with the early history of Kentucky prior to and after its admission to the union as the fifteenth state.

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